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after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americans from japan and u.s. officials reminded those staying behind to get out of that 50-mile danger zone around the fukushima dai-ichi plant. the reactors damaged by friday's earthquake and tsunami were bombarded today with water mr. from helicopters, police water cannons and fire trucks to try to cool them off and prevent a meltdown, but it's not at all clear if it's working. and in washington, the head of the nuclear regulatory commission said it could take weeks to get these reactors under control. bill whitaker in japan begins our coverage. >> reporter: this new video released today gives the clearest picture yet of the stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. >> what we're seeing is that the damage from the fires is very significant. >> reporter: today, japanese military helicopters with protective led-lined cockpits dumped water on reactor three, attempting to cool the nuclear fuel rods. but much of the water appeared to disperse in the wind. police and firefighters also brought in water cannons to douse the reactor but
>> couric: tonight, as allied forces pound targets in libya, the u.s. military insists qaddafi is not a target, but the commander in chief makes it clear... >> it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebels solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the opera
in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the operation to other nations within days. the president and british prime minister david cameron said qaddafi must go though they insisted he is not a target of the attacks. but a cruise missile attack last night may have been too close for comfort for the libyan dictator. mark phillips is in tripoli. >> reporter: of all the targets that have been hit in these attacks, this flattened building in the qaddafi compound in tripoli is the one the qaddafi loyalists have complained about most. this is the attack they claim was launched to kill him. despite the hundreds of people who have gathered or been gathered around the complex to provide protection. >> families, children, men and women have come from everywhere to stay day and night to protect this location, to protect this location and the rocket hits only 52 to 100 meters away from them. >> reporter: qaddafi himself was probably not in his tent. he hasn't been seen since before the bombing began. his location a se
with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and today on capitol hill, u.s. energy secretary and nuclear expert steven chu said he, too, is baffled. >> and ther
>> couric: tonight, the u.s. uses a warplane as the allies keep up the assault on libya and qaddafi remains defiant. >> (translated): we win. we will be victorious in this historical battle. we will not surrender. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, they survived one disaster, now these japanese have been forced to take shelter against another threat-- nuclear radiation. america's nuclear problem. where to store permanently more than 145 million pounds of spent fuel rods. and college students struggling to make the grade. what some schools are doing to make sure they graduate. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's four days into a u.s.-led assault on his military, and libya's moammar qaddafi has lost radar installations, tanks, and naval facilities but not his defiance. he appeared in public tonight in tripoli vowing to fight on and telling supporters he will win and will not surrendered. qaddafi's forces kept up their attacks on civilians today in a n
but not u.s. a top qaddafi insider who defected and his connection to pan am flight 103. i'm erica hill. also tonight, milk in the u.s. now showing traces of radiation from japan. what authorities are doing to keep you safe. why did plants that bury nuclear waste inside nevada's yucca mountain get killed? was it safety fears or politics? and the sweet taste of success. they owe their lottery jackpot to a candy bar. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> hill: good evening. katie is off tonight. muammar qaddafi's inner circle continues to shrink. first, his foreign minister defected last night. and then today, his u.n. ambassador quit while in egypt. just the same, qaddafi's military, though decimated by allied air strikes, is still pounding rebel forces. driving them further east away from key oil towns. one rebel leader compared qaddafi to a wounded animal, one that's more dangerous than a healthy one, which once again raises the question-- just what should the u.s. do moving forward? david martin b
much time. u.s. and allied warships are stationed off the coast of libya ready to launch cruise missile that would take out qaddafi's command centers and air defense network. after that, aircraft-- mostly british and french operating from bases in the mediterranean-- would enforce a no-fly zone and threaten his ground forces with air strikes if they attack the rebels. the president promised no american troops would gol into libya while one way or another, said secretary of state clinton, qaddafi has to go. >> we do believe that a final result of any negotiations would have to be the decision by colonel qaddafi to leave. >> reporter: secretary clinton will be in paris tomorrow for one last round of talks with allies. but unless qaddafi orders first a cease-fire and then a retreat, the time for talking seems to be up. tonight there is no sign qaddafi's forces are observing a cease-fire much less pulling back. in fact, one u.s. official says they are still advancing on benghazi. harry? >> smith: david, what happens if these qaddafi forces keep moving toward benghazi? >> reporter: benghazi
will lead the operation when the u.s. steps back in the days ahead, though nato is expected to play a major role. meanwhile, a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed today in eastern libya. the two men on board ejected and were rescued. a cbs news poll out tonight finds most americans are following the events in libya closely and nearly seven out of ten approve of the air strikes. mandy clark begins our coverage from the scene of that fighter jet crash. >> reporter: this is all that remains of the american f-15e that went down last night. a steady stream of people came to have a look. saleh saeed saleh, a local farmer, was eager to show us the wreckage. when it it this ground he says it sounded like a rocket exploding. he thought qaddafi's forces were on the attack. officials say the fighter jet crashed because of a mechanical error rather than any enemy fire. it landed east of benghazi which is in the heart of rebel territory. the jet's crew ejected safely. were they okay? were they injured? "the person i saw had minor injuries, just scratches" he says. one of the americans landed in a nearby
's more dangerous than a healthy one, which once again raises the question-- just what should the u.s. do moving forward? david martin begins our coverage. >> reporter: there may be no american troops on the ground, but c.i.a. officers are operating inside libya. among other things, they picked up a member of the air crew of that american jet which crashed last week. their primary goal is to find out who the rebels are and what they need, but defense secretary gates today threw cold water on the idea that the u.s. is about to start arming or training the rebels. >> there are many countries that can do that. that's not a unique capability for the united states, and as far as i'm concerned, somebody else should do that. >> reporter: but gates clearly thinks somebody, perhaps an arab country, should. >> the opposition needs as much as anything right now is some training, some command and control, and some organization. it's a pretty-- it's pretty much a pickup ballgame at this point. >> reporter: testifying on the day nato took command of the operation, gates said the u.s. would start pullin
a fierce debate-- should the u.s. arm the opposition? i'm erica hill. also tonight, kicking the habit. the president wants to cut oil imports by a third, and some drivers have already gotten the message. hyperactive kids-- why some experts believe artificial food coloring could make the behavior worse. >> mr. president! >> and a bullet meant for president reagan nearly took this man's life. 30 years later james brady is still fighting for gun control. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> hill: good evening. katie is off tonight. just two days ago, libyan rebels seemed ready to move on muammar qaddafi's home town and possibly on tripoli, but tonight, they are on the move in the other direction. their weapons, machine guns for the most part are, no march for qaddafi's heavier weaponry. secretary of state hillary clinton said today no decision has been made about whether to arm the rebels, but there are also reports president obama recently signed a secret order authorizing covert support for them.
ruled yemen for 32 years. he is a key u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda. meanwhile, president obama plans to speak to the nation monday night about libya to explain why he ordered u.s. military action and give an update on the operation. today french and british jets struck libyan artillery and tanks near ajdabiya. smoke could be seen miles away. late today, rebels began a new push to retake the city. and libyan state television showed damage from overnight air strikes in tripoli. nato, which is taking over control of enforcing the no-fly zone, said it's planning for a mission that would last three months. as other nations play a larger role, the u.s. is publicly taking a step back, but it's a small step. more on that from david martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: this is what the battle for libya looks like to a pilot. it's a british pilot attacking a libyan tank. but more than half the 96 strike missions in the past 24 hours were american. and so were all 16 of the tomahawk cruise missiles fired overnight. despite the announcement that nato would soon be taking command of t
'll see you in 30 minutes, cbs evening news is next. >> couric: tonight president obama warns the u.s. and nato are considering a military response to the crisis in libya as qaddafi's forces step up attacks on rebel-held oil towns. i'm katie couric. the violence is driving up the price you pay at the pump. but where's the money going? maybe not where you think, and should the u.s. tap the strategic reserves to bring prices down? they're here, the new 3-d mammograms. but should women be rushing to get one? and she's worn his m.i.a. bracelet for nearly 40 years waiting for the day she could remove it. that day has come. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. libyan government forces were back on the offensive today trying to retake more territory still held by the rebels. some of the heaviest fighting was in towns near tripoli and the u.n. says more than a million libyans now need humanitarian aid. president obama warned moammar qaddafi and his supporters they will be
. also tonight, passing the baton. the u.s. is planning to turn over leadership of the libya mission to nato. tokyo's water is declared safe again, but not before a radiation scare causes a run on bottled water. and an air traffic controller in washington is suspended after falling asleep. leaving commercial jetliners to land on their own. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. every so often the census bureau gives americans a look in the mirror to see who we are and how we're changing and a report from the bureau today says one thing that's changing is the racial and ethnic makeup of the country with the hispanic population growing rapidly. one out of six adults is now hispanic as is one out of four children. in the past ten years, the overall u.s. population has grown by 27 million to 308 million and hispanics account for more than half the increase. more now from nancy cordes. >> reporter: salt lake city's newest grocery store caters to a group that census figur
across the pacific to the u.s. reaching the west coast. japan declares a state of emergency at a nuclear plant as radiation levels surge. the area around it is evacuated. and the ring of fire. why this area of the pacific is so vulnerable to earthquakes. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it is saturday morning in japan. the sun is up and the extent of the catastrophe is becoming painfully clear. it's been nearly 24 hours since a powerful earthquake touched off a huge tsunami that swept across japan's east coast. the quake, a magnitude 8.9, was the fifth-largest in modern history. centered off japan's northeast coast, it was felt for 1,300 miles. very early reports say more than 400 people are dead. japan's kyoto news agency says the final number is expected to top 1,000. most of the victims drowned. nearly 1,000 are reported injured, more than 500 are missing. and four million homes and businesses lost power. the first estimate of the damage: $10 billion. that dama
>> couric: tonight, rebels in libya beat back attempts by the army to retake lost territory. the u.s. steps up the pressure on cadmy to quit, but he's still not giving up. i'm katie couric. also tonight, deep trouble in the midwest. heavy rain and melting snow adds up to flooding that's sweeping through hundreds of homes. are teachers taking a lesson from the labor dispute in wisconsin? a union leader is giving some ground on the red-hot issue of tenure. and the american spirit. an artist who brings to life a world his eyes cannot see. from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. moammar qaddafi's latest offensive was a colossal failure and tonight he's more isolated than ever. troops loyal to qaddafi tried to retake three cities overnight but they were repelled by rebel forces. today in one of those cities, zawiyah, there were celebrations in the streets. the people are firmly in charge and demanding qaddafi go. secretary of state hillary clinton warned that unless he does, libya is at risk of a lo
. at the same time, u.s. and coalition partners kept up the military attacks, launching 22 cruise missile on targets in tripoli. qaddafi's forces, however, are still better armed than the opposition and today they have the rebels on the run. they were forced to retreat just as they prepared to attack qaddafi's hometown of surt. instead, though, they were pushed back more than 25 miles, and not just by the military baby civilians who remain loyal to qaddafi. mandy clark reports tonight from the ever-shifting front line. >> reporter: an attack by qaddafi forces took rebels by surprise at bin jawad. they fought hard with everything they had but were forced back. and even while fleeing came under fire. they had originally retreated to the town because of a new threat rebels here say it wasn't just government forces but also residents firing from their homes that forced them to pull back. they confiscated these weapons handed out by qaddafi forces from locals who were loyal to the regime. how many weapons did you find in total? >> reporter: another problem the anti-qaddafi forces are facing: s
and tsunami, a desperate search for food, water and missing loved ones. and on the u.s. west coast, fears of radiation results in a run on potassium iodide. but is there really cause for concern? captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. japan is dealing tonight with the aftermath of one catastrophe while trying to prevent another. we'll have much more about the earthquake and tsunami in a moment. the official death toll is nearly 3,400. but first, the nuclear crisis. radiation continues to leak from damaged nuclear reactors in fukushima, 140 miles north of tokyo. an estimated 50 workers are still trying desperately to cool them to prevent a meltdown. in the meantime, 70,000 people have been evacuated from an area within 12 miles of the dai-ichi plant and 140,000 more living within 120 miles of the facility have been told to stay inside. japan has imposed a no-fly zone over that area for commercial air traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on ame
are soaring and the area is being evacuated. most flights between the u.s. and japan have been canceled, and there were fear it is tsunami would pound the u.s., but by the time the waves reached hawaii and the west coast this morning, they had lost most of their punch. president obama said he's heartbroken by the disaster. u.s. assistance is already on the way to japan. lucy craft is there. >> reporter: the monster quake, thought to be the largest in japan's history triggered a ferocious series of tsunamis. a 23-foot wall of water poured over the northern japanese coastline with little warning. only minutes after the quick hit sweeping away everything and everyone in its path. cars were tossed like toys. boats were battered by the tides. this tanker was swept up on to the shore. another ship fought to escape a massive whirlpool. and the state of the boat and its crew is unknown. >> a tsunami obviously coming in several sweeps. >> reporter: minutes later a a second deadly wave. surging water overtook coastal city streets, ripping fishing boats from their moorings and swamping buildings.
pictures, ro, take a look. >> couric: tonight, libya's oil facilities under attack as the u.s. gets set to talk to nato allies about imposing a no-fly zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, a difficult ash wednesday for some catholics. parishioners in the philadelphia area learn if their priest is suspected of sex abuse. the suspect in the tucson massacre comes face to face with some of the victims. and overnight, a mother of one becomes a mother to nine keeping her family together after tragedy strikes. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. what, if anything, can the obama administration do about the situation in libya? as the white house continues to weigh its options, moammar qaddafi's forces keep pounding the opposition from the air and on the ground. 30 miles from tripoli, government troops retook most of zawiyah today after almost a week of bitter fighting. hospital officials report dozens of deaths on both sides. in the east, where the rebels control almost all
to use them. so as the u.s. considers its options, it will have to consider not just weapons but training. >> >> and one of them certainly will be arming the rebels, which requires american special forces on the ground to do this right. >> michael o'hanlon of the brookings institution believes a few hundred antitank weapons would swing the tide of battle in a matter of days but it would also violate president obama's repeated pledge not put american boots on the ground in libya. >> it may not have to be the united states. there's good reason to think some european special forces could do compearably well, maybe even better in some ways given their contacts. >> reporter: bout who would they be arming? u.s. intelligence is still trying to determine what lurks behind the public face. the admiral who has taken command of the operation said there are concerns the rebels may include some of america's worst enemies. >> we have seen flickers in the intelligence of potential al qaeda, hezbollah. we've seen different things. >> reporter: the president has not yet decided whether to arm the rebels,
. meanwhile, two u.s. warships passed through the suez canal today heading closer to libya. defense secretary robert gates says they could be used to evacuate civilians. the libyan border is overwhelmed with refugees. 30,000 are waiting to get into tunisia. and some foreign workers were able to get out on ships bound for egypt. but back to today's major development, qaddafi's failed offensive in brega. mandy clark was there and reports tonight from benghazi. >> reporter: this is the excitement of victory in the town near today's major battle, cars bearing rebel fighters braced the front line. their comrades splaived water on them and cheered. when word came in of an apparent rebel victory down road, this was a scene of wild celebration. but now these fighters are rushing to get a new shipment of weapons ready for any possible counter-attack. the battle began with an assault by government troops before dawn and included bombing runs by qaddafi's warplanes. >> they are bombing us by very big bombs. >> reporter: by late afternoon, the rebels were on the offensive. down the road, survivors arrive
the rebels in several key cities, u.s. aid arrives in tunisia for refugees fleeing the violence. the tragic death of a star high school athlete just moments after he leads his team to victory. and they call this the most dangerous eight seconds in sports. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. president obama is keeping his exuberance in check over today's news about unemployment. he calls it progress. the unemployment rate-- 9% or higher for a record 21 months-- has finally dropped below that mark, falling last month to 8.9%. and the pace of hiring is picking up. the economy added 192,000 jobs. anthony mason is our senior business correspondent. anthony, the recession has been officially over for months now. finally it looks like the job market is catching up. >> reporter: after months of disappointingly weak numbers, katie, the labor market is finally flexing some muscle. in wisconsin this week, the oshkosh corporation was hiring 750 workers to make military vehicles. >>
qaddafi and his supporters they will be held accountable for the violence and the u.s. and its allies are still considering military options. today, nato plans began round-the-clock surveillance of libya. opposition forces in the east want nato to ground qaddafi's air force after it bombed several key oil towns today. mandy clark reports tonight from abbey ya. >> reporter: this is why libya's rebels are begging for a no-fly zone. we were the first journalists on the scene after this bombing. people ignored the danger and raced to show us the damage. he's hitting his own people with bombs, young children, he's killing them, this man says. just minutes ago we were driving down the road to get to the front line when a government warplane dropped two bombs behind us. the shrapnel from those bombs is still warm. near the craters, the wreckage of a pickup truck. a family with three children was in it when qaddafi's air force struck. two of the children died. the survivors were slashed by the slash nell. the circling warplanes made for a jumpy day on the front lines. do you find that even th
you! [ laughter ] >> couric: tonight, japan asks for u.s. help cooling nuclear reactors damaged by the earthquake as it tries desperately to prevent meltdown. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the unfolding humanitarian crisis. four days after the earthquake and tsunami, there are shortages of food and housing for the living. body bags and coffins for the growing number of dead. the search goes on for victims in towns virtually wiped off the map. and how safe are we with nuclear plants here at home built on fault lines and striking distances of tsunamis. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone, any one of them alone would be overwhelming, but japan is dealing with three crises: humanitarian, economic, and nuclear, including the possibility of a meltdown. we'll have much more about that in a moment. it's tuesday morning in japan and four days after the earthquake and tsunami. the death toll continues to rise. officially 1,900, but one local police chief estimates 10
, frankly, the use of the u.s. military in another country in the middle east. >> reporter: gates said he was unable to gauge the rebels' chances of overthrowing qaddafi. >> it remains to be seen how effectively military leaders who have defected from qaddafi's forces can organize the opposition in the country. >> reporter: secretary of state clinton ticked off future scenarios for libya, and two out of three were bad. >> libya could become a peaceful democracy or it could face protracted civil war or it could descend into chaos. >> reporter: the u.s. and britain are openly talking about setting up a no-fly zone over libya. >> it is not acceptable to have a situation where colonel qaddafi can be murdering his own people, using airplanes and helicopter gunships and the like and we have to plan now to make sure if that happens we can do something to stop it. >> reporter: but china and russia are likely to oppose any u.n. resolution authorizing a no-fly zone and gates has not yet ordered the aircraft carrier "enterprise" into the mediterranean. general james mattis who who commands u.s. forc
traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on americans to leave tokyo because of radiation concerns. and u.s. officials say it's unlikely dangerous levels of radiation will reach hawaii or the u.s. mainland. we have extensive coverage of the disaster in japan beginning with harry smith on the nuclear crisis. >> reporter: after a day of sharp spikes, radiation levels at the earthquake stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear plant are said to be falling. this morning there are reports of a new fire at the plant. people throughout japan are on edge. >> ( translated ): they say we are safe but it makes me wonder. it is really safe? >> reporter: japan's prime minister, naoto kan, tried to reassure his country but he said more radiation leaks are likely and ordered those in the danger zone to seal themselves indoors. american sean scisle says his plan is to get out while he can. >> last night we packed bags in case of an emergency and, you know, just better safe than sorry. we're probably going to be getting out of fukushima prefecture either late tonight or early tomorr
in the u.s. has jumped almost 40 cents a gallon. that's certainly pinching people in the wallet, but economists say it's not enough to derail a recovery. you'd have to see oil double in price for that to happen. you know, that's not impossible but it's highly unlikely at this point. >> couric: all right. anthony mason. anthony, thank you. now turning to libya and some of the fiercest battles yet as moammar qaddafi struck back today at the opposition. in tripoli, his forces quickly put down protests following friday prayers using tear gas and bullets. the state-owned phone company sent text messages calling on libyans to attack foreigners. and all internet service was cut. across the board her tunisia, the humanitarian crisis finally began to ease. two u.s. military planes delivered blankets and other supplies to foreign workers who had fled the fighting in libya. plans are being made to fly some of them to their home countries tomorrow. in eastern libya, a battle raged all day as opposition forces tried to capture a key oil town and qaddafi's air force bombed benghazi. mandy cla
their sites on qaddafi's hometown of surt. just the same, a top u.s. military official says the rebels are not a robust fighting force and their gains may not be permanent. mandy clark is with the rebels in ras lanuf. >> this could be the midwest decisive battle yet in libya's civil war. in the span of just 48 hours, the ragtag army of students, laborers and some soldiers once loyal to the regime are now threatening qaddafi's hometown. the push west would have been impossible without coalition air strikes that pounded qaddafi's tanks and troops and trapped rebels in ajdabiya. allied air raids forced the regime's army into full retreat, allowing the rebels to retake control of the key oil hubs of brega and ras lanuf. despite those gains, these men are moving cautiously. they want to avoid traps set by qaddafi's forces. the first push to tripoli ended here in bin jiwad. rebels, believing residents were on their side, were led into a deadly ambush. now they say they've learned from that costly mistake. rebels say they're now doing clearing operations. >> ( translated ): we have learned to
today. coffins and body bags are in short supply and crematoriums are overwhelmed. u.s. and other foreign aid is pouring in for the millions of survivors in need of food, water and housing. emergency shelters are overflowing. japan's central bank pumped billions of dollars into the country's economy to shore it up. the prime minister is taking charge of managing the nuclear crisis and he's asking the u.s. for technical expertise to cool the damaged reactors and prevent a meltdown. u.s. officials say experts see no scenario in which harmful levels of radiation will reach the united states. we have a team of correspondents deployed throughout japan tonight. first, celia hatton in fukushima >> reporter: japan's nuclear nightmare continues, a second hydrogen explosion at the fukushima dai-ichi nuclear complex in just three days injured 11 workers. like saturday's initial explosion, today's blast destroyed the reactor's exterior though officials say its core is intact. this was followed by news another reactor in the complex is also overheating so the prospect of a third explosion is l
risks. >> reporter: while the fighting continues, the u.s. is searching for options that would both force qaddafi to quit and that the rest of the world can agree on. >> we believe it's important that this not be an american or a nato or a european effort. it needs to be an international one. and there is still a lot of opposition. >> reporter: the most dramatic option under serious consideration is to establish a no-fly zone that would put an end to the bombing runs conducted by qaddafi's air force. defense secretary gates has warned that would require airstrikes against libya, most likely cruise missiles fired from ships offshore. >> a no-fly zone begins with an attack on libya. to destroy the air defenses. >> this is not risk-free. as a matter of fact, it's very high risk. >> reporter: now retired, david deptula ran a no-fly zone over iraq with the force of 50 planes and 1600 people. >> with that number of people and aircraft, we operated inside iraqi airspace about six hours a day, three to four times a week. >> reporter: that's him in the front seat of an f-15. iraqi aircraft r
that could cost him his job. a federal agent tells cbs news he was ordered to let guns from the u.s. make their way to mexican drug cartels. i'm katie couric. also tonight, president obama's message to qaddafi. >> the violence must stop. moammar qaddafi has lost the legitimacy to lead and he must leave. >> couric: with the threat of a lockout hanging over the players n.f.l. contract talks go into overtime. and sea otters under attack from sharks and something more mysterious. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they are two presidents leading a war against a common enemy: mexican drug cartels. president obama welcomed mexico's president felipe calderon to the white house today and mr. obama said the two countries are making progress against drug gangs. >> to combat the southbound flow of guns and money we are screening all southbound rail cargo, seizing many more guns bound for mexico and we are putting more gunrunners behind bars. >> couric: but one of the men on the
the table, including imposing a no-fly zone which would ground libya's air force. today the u.s. moved a destroyer and a marine amphibious task force closer to libya, and the treasury said at least $30 billion in libyan assets have been frozen. in spite of all that and with much of libya in opposition hands, qaddafi still refuses to leave, telling abc "all my people love me." we have a team of correspondents in the region. first, kelly cobiella in tripoli >> reporter: for the second time, a funeral in this eastern suburb of tripoli turned into a protest. people here claimed qaddafi's gunmen killed five of their neighbors during demonstrations last friday. what you don't see are qaddafi's security forces, as they arrived shooting their guns in the air foreign journalists were forced to leave. a cell phone camera caught this battle 125 miles from the capital in the city of misurata. qaddafi's men have been trying to retake an airfield and ammunitions depot for days and still haven't won. closer to the capital, just 30 miles to the west, anti- government protestors are holding the oil ref
another. >> reporter: but republicans say a spike in u.s. jihadist terror plots justify their focus. between may of 2009 and november, 2010, arrests were made for 22 such plots-- more than in the previous seven years combined. >> there is that small element in the community that's radicalizing. >> reporter: poisoning the atmosphere was king's own past assertion-- that most u.s. mosques are run by radicals. >> cleaning a dirty kitchen you can't clean it with dirty water. >> reporter: king is from long island and his relations with muslim leaders there deteriorated after 9/11. >> we have some serious concerns because congressman king has been a muslim barber. >> reporter: keith ellison, one of two muslim congressmen, broke down as he recalled a paramedic killed on 9/11 who was later smeared because of his muslim faith. >> his life should not be identify as just a member of the ethnic group or just a member of a religion. >> reporter: despite the tension, king called this his happiest day. >> i challenge anyone to find anything that was improper about today's hearing. >> reporter: in f
again that u.s. involvement would be limited, with coalition allies taking over command of the operation. chip reid is at the white house tonight with more on the president's speech. chip, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, russ. the president said he refused to wait for images of slaughter and mass graves before taking action in libya. >> when our interests and values are at stake we have a responsibility to act. >> reporter: president obama explained why he believes it was imperative to take military action in libya. >> to brush aside america's responsibility as a leader and, more profoundly, our responsibilities to our fellow human beings under such circumstances would have been a betrayal of who we are. >> reporter: the president said the intervention in libya is succeeding and said it would be a limited engagement. >> going forward, the lead enn enforcing the nvz and protecting civilians on the ground will transition to you are a allies and partners and i am fully confident that our coalition will keep the pressure on qaddafi's remaining forces. in that effort, the united stat
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